French, wine
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Tour de Burgundy and Rhone – Part 4 – Le Puy-en-Velay, Sarlat-la-Canéda

I am back! I suddenly had to leave for a week-long trip in the middle of posting on my Burgundy trip after Part 3, leaving my readers in bewilderment. This unfinished post bothered me throughout the trip, which was a telltale of my life  infatuated with blogging. Why do I care so much about blogging? I do not have the answer, but all I know is that I feel good when I put my thoughts into words, whether or not others care to read my articles or not. Blogging is therapeutic for me, not about bragging. 

rhone-drive-2After days of driving, drinking and lack of sleep, I couldn’t wait to get back to Bordeaux and have a sip of rich and powerful red and a good rest. So I didn’t go further south to Chateauneauf-du-Pape, which I had already tasted and knew.

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The drive through the Rhone Valley up to this village at the altitude of 1120 metres was incredible.

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It was still winter up there. Saint-Bonnet-le-Froid, it was called I think. Who choses to live here? It turned out it was a town for pilgrims.

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Past the valley, we came to Le Puy-en-Velay, one of the places on the  routes of Saitn Jaques pilgrimage (The way of Saint James). We made an unexpected stop in this spiritual town and paid a visit to the Cathédrale Notre-Dame du Puy and climbed up the statue of Virgin Mary, which was the scariest thing I’d done in years!

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It was my third accidental stopoff on the Saint Jacques routes. I don’t think I am duplicating the life of Eat, Pray, Love, – oh, god, no! – but when I see the similarities in her stories and mine, I feel annoyed. The one thing that is clear is that I won’t be marrying a wine maker as she did. *sigh* Hopefully, I will build my own winery, instead.

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It was a really lovely medieval town, though I had the worst meal ever. If you have a chance, walk to Hotel-Dieu at night. It has a strange ambience with the sound of pigeons breathing.

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The next day we were back on the road, now through sunny and green pasture, and had the last picnic with the local cheese, Saint Nectaire, and jambon.

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The last stop was the inevitable Sarlat-la-Canéda, supposedly a town for gourmets where many food related workshops are held and people flock to eat confit, foie gras, truffles, etc. It was a charming village, though very touristic. The menus were the same in every restaurant so we had hard time finding a place for authentic local food.

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But we found one, called La Rapiere, and had a lovely meal. The confit was really tender and the poato was delicious. Oh..finally sipping Bordeaux wine!

sarlat-confit

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The Cèpe mushroom dish was quite rich but delicious – most importantly not in the form of omelette at least like all other restaurants. The staff were friendly and I liked the interior and huge bottles of cognac. The chestnut cake was moist and light, which was a different version from the one I had in Cahors.

sarlat-noix
This is how I ended my gastronomic and spiritual adventure. It feels very strange to write about this trip after coming back from my Aegean trip. The world revolves slowly when you don’t have a smart phone or iPhone, but nowadays people seem to expect everyone to be wired to the internet 24/7 and writing about an event that happened a month ago, even a week ago, feels so awkward and outdated that I can’t ignore the guilty feeling. Is it normal?

This entry was posted in: French, wine

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Hello, I'm Namie and I like exploring different cuisines and creating something that is delicious and healthy at the same time. I'm also a certified wine lover and interested in discovering exciting new wines. For a wine and food event, please feel free to contact me. ewmistanbul@gmail.com

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