All posts filed under: Exploring Turkish Cuisine

spinach meatball

Spinach Kale Cheese Balls with Quick Harissa

What I love about my new neighborhood, which is one of the best areas as far as the livability goes, there is a huge park where you can jog or play tennis or all sorts of activities happen all the time. I watched a classical concert and Eurasia dance show all by chance. On top of that, you can eat a big open-buffet breakfast on a lazy Sunday morning. Every Monday a big, I mean a HUGE farmer’s market (you can check go on to Son Mastori and click on the link) and there is also an organic market every Wednesday. If not at those farmers’ markets, there is still a small indoor traditional market where I usually shop for my everyday needs. “Let’s support small grocers!” I never buy groceries at supermarkets. No matter how cheaper things are in supermarkets and no matter how many ‘Buy 1 Get 1 Free‘ deals there are to tempt me. I love the interactions with people. I don’t get ripped off in this neighborhood as I used to. …

Meze and Raki – Turkish Flavours

This post was meant to be posted 3 weeks ago but I got caught in work as usual… Having a personal blog, not for business or professional purpose, gives me the liberty of writing whatever and whenever I write and honestly, but I also have a silent wish that my blog can reach more audience. It was so timely that I ran into the wonderful and soothing article, ‘Maintaining a long-term blog‘ on 101 Cookbooks, which is one of my favourites. You might have already read it, if you’re following her blog. The author’s been blogging for 12 years and is still as consistent and committed as day one. While reading the article, I felt the heat rising in the cheeks, mostly probably out of shame for being so inconsistent with my blog. My blog will be celebrating its 2nd birthday in 2 weeks; I messed up my blog once by changing the domain name and I hope it doesn’t affect its birthday. While checking the first entry, I noticed some posts had been left …

Turkish Melon Yogurt Ice cream

As you might have read, I went on a guerrilla trip from Istanbul to Bodrum, joining Mr.O’s relatives and friends along the way. When we were coming back to Istanbul, we brought some Aegean foods with us. The things I always pick up at the roadside stalls are tomatoes, melons and watermelons, for which  Canakkale is renowned, while we snack on fresh figs and other fruit close to Izmir while driving. I love a road trip in late August because of the lush landscapes and the sight of fresh food stalls at village markets. I will share photos from a market in Bodrum in another post later. Also, I always look forward to tasting ice cream in Canakkale and Assos, where you can taste the best ice cream in Turkey, which is a slightly different or improved version in my opinion, so fresh and not so sweet. In case you are new to my blog, I can link you to the eternal place in my heart, Assos and how it is the reason I fell …

Gastronomy of Kars came to Istanbul

Wow, what an excitement it was to have found the gastronomic event at SALT Beyoğlu just in time! I’d been planning to visit Kars, the city that is unknown to many Turks. I was first interested in this place solely because of the Kars eski kasar cheese, which I felt in love with. Later while doing a bit of research on other culinary aspects of Kars, I learned that the city is also very famous for geese, or kaz as called locally. I’ve come across so many interesting historical facts, websites, and blogs, one of which is Eating Asia. Reading the articles about their gastronomic adventures in Kars, I was getting giddy and impatient. I exchanged a few emails with the photographer and journalist, who very kindly gave me useful tips for my future trip. As I was getting only a shrug and a dubious look, I was almost giving up the complicated journey to get there. However, “Following my passions will always get me to the places you want to be.” the encouraging words …

When Turkey meets Poland?

I’ve just come back from a short sea break in the Aegean sea. I’ve posted some photos on my FB page during the trip as I was feeling guilty for keeping the readers in suspense, but here I am back to my sweet home and to where I’d left off. What makes a great cuisine? I’ve put this question to many chefs and each time I get “mixing” for an answer, taking freshness as a base. Many chefs say that they’re always pressured, if not inspired, to travel overseas and come up with new dishes with new tastes. It’s so true when you look at the history of world cuisines. The time of homogenous cuisine has long gone as more and more people travel and experience diverse flavours. Imagine the world where everyone eats the same food and all the restaurants cook the same dishes. B.O.R.I.N.G. Life is too short to eat the same food twice. Inspiration is in the hand of chefs who care about what we eat. When I walk in the streets …

Zucchini series #3 – Candy Festival and Buckwheat Zucchini Fritters

How lucky am I to have all the lovely people around who make a little mouse “me” – feel cared for and happy. On the day of Candy Feast or Şeker Bayram in Turkish, this holy gracious amaretto liqueur was served to us by Mr.O’s parents, along with the best almonds and almond paste. Surprised by this unexpected treat, I bugged Mr.O again with questions related to this Turkish amaretto. Perhaps, the reason Mr.O is losing weight despite all the food he eats with me is to be interrogated about food and food history. Anyway, what a treat it was! This is  one of the reason I love Mr.O’s dad so much; he reads my culinary mind perfectly. And we left with more zucchini….and you know what will happen, right? This series will never have an ending. Kids, whether they are 10 year olds or 30 year olds, are equally treated with sweet things during this festival. After a lovely meal, we made a visit to the oldest in the family, Mr.O’s aunt. We tend …